US, allies condemn Iran over missiles to Yemen

The US and three European allies condemned Iran on Tuesday (February 27th) after the UN found Tehran had violated the arms embargo on Yemen by failing to block supplies of missiles and drones to Houthi (Ansarallah) fighters, AFP reported Wednesday.

Britain, France, Germany and the US urged Iran to "immediately cease all activities that are inconsistent or would violate" the UN resolution that established the arms embargo in 2015.

The joint condemnation came a day after Russia vetoed a British-drafted resolution renewing sanctions on Yemen and citing "particular concern" about a report's findings on Iran.

The report by a UN panel of experts in January concluded that Iran was in violation after determining that missiles fired by the Houthis at Saudi Arabia last year were made in Iran.

Russia, however, questioned the findings and blocked the resolution, saying the report did not contain conclusive evidence of Iran's violation of the arms embargo.

"We condemn Iran's non-compliance, as described by the panel, which poses serious risks to peace and stability in the region," said the joint statement.

The resolution was vetoed by Russia after 11 countries voted in favor at the 15-member Security Council.

China and Kazakhstan abstained and Bolivia voted against it.

In other news, 17 Houthis were killed Thursday and dozens injured in battles in Nahm in Sanaa, Al-Arabiya reported.

"National army forces fought fierce battles with the Houthi militia in Nahm, east of the capital, and killed 17 militiamen, and wounded dozens," the Yemeni army said in a statement.

The Houthi fighters were trying to sneak into the al-Tabab mountains in the last two days to control this vital location, it said.

Among those killed were three Houthi field commanders, the statement said. Another 33 were captured, including four field commanders.

The army was able to retrieve large amounts of weapons and ammunition following the battles in Nahm.

Do you like this article?
0
0 COMMENT(S)
COMMENT POLICY